Category Archives: Converting to Electric Heat

Using Electric Cove & Baseboard heaters for discounted electric utility rates

We get the following question frequently:

“My local electric company told me to look into Baseboard or Cove heaters for additional off-peak electrical usage”

Some Electric Utilities and Co-ops have programs such as off-peak electrical rates, electric heating rate, dual fuel, deferred load, RDC system, etc.

In North Dakota, The Northern Plains Electric Cooperative will give you the “electric heating rate” and will even provide thousands of dollars of financing at a low interest rate for your installation of electric heat as detailed on their website: http://www.nplains.com/Save_Energy_and_Be_Safe/energy_equip/baseboard/index.html

The great thing about this approach is that off-peak rates are seen during the nighttime hours when the need for heat is the greatest because the sun is down and the temperatures are colder. You don’t necessarily have to have an Electric Thermal Storage Heater system to take advantage of off-peak.

We tend to focus most of our stock on the shelf in the Qmark brand of cove heaters and can order many other brands for you. The great thing about cove heaters is that they are mounted very close to the ceiling on the wall and they enable you to place your furniture anywhere, unlike baseboard heaters which would be “blocked” by something like a large couch. Radiant heat energy is directed downward, warming people and objects near the floor.

Qmark Cove Heaters
Dimensions:
Height 4″ x Width 2 7/8″ x Length (varies by Catalog # from 34″ to 132″)

Electric heating with low voltage thermostats and relays

The same low voltage thermostats that are used to control central heating and cooling systems can also be used with electric comfort heating when combined with a relay instead of a line voltage thermostat.

In the low volt setup, the switching of the power on and off (controlling of a line voltage resistive load) is done by an external electromechanical relay instead of the thermostat.

The Aube RC840T Series Electromechanical Relay is one of the options, it has a built-in 24 V transformer, operates silently, and on a call for heat, the relay is immediately activated with no delay. It is wired to the thermostat with common thermostat wire and the relay is wired to the heater with common 12 gauge building wire.

It can be very advantageous to use electric heat relays and low voltage thermostats instead of line voltage thermostats.  Low voltage thermostats offer a vastly greater selection and better availability.  There are even options to control the temperature of every room in your house from any computer or smartphone with thermostats such as Honeywell’s new Prestige thermostat.  Another benefit of low voltage thermostats is that a room that requires more than 5,000 watts is easier to control with one thermostat instead of 2 or more and the room will be more comfortable because the temperature will vary less.

Electrical contractors are familiar with how to install and mount relays and follow local building codes regarding the use of both low and line voltage in your system. Relays can be mounted in a varietry of areas such as inside baseboard heaters, on an accessable junction box or panel in the room or the basement below the rooms being heated.

Converting from a Propane furnace to Zoned Electric Heating

A customer gave us data about their savings from converting their entire house to electric comfort heat (every room, controlled to only heat the rooms being used, when they are using them.)  They have an electric dryer, propane water heater, propane range and central air conditioning.  They are a family of 6 with a ranch house in Lower Michigan with 1,375 square feet on the main level.

06/2007-05/2008 bills:
Electric $1,002 @ 12 cents kwh
Propane $1,455 @ $1.92 per Gallon
Total $2,457

06/2008-05/2009 bills:
Electric $990 @ 12 cents kwh
Propane $1,883 @ $2.07 per Gallon
Total $2,873

The electric heat was installed in late October of 2009 at a cost of $780, which was paid for by the savings in the first year:

06/2009-05/2010 bills:
Electric $1,357 @ 12 cents kwh
Propane $703 @ $2.57 per Gallon
Total $2,060

06/2010-05/2011 bills:
Electric $1,808 @ 12 cents kwh
Propane $811 @ $2.00 per Gallon
Total $2,619

The customer estimates that with the old system, the total bills would now be up to $3,100 because the family has grown from 3 to 6 since 2007.  A savings of $500 per year is sustained now. The customer is also considering future advances in wind power, fuel cells and solar power to supply the house with free electricity to power the heaters, etc.

Many converting to electric heat due to RECORD HIGH HEATING OIL

The EIA weekly update shows Heating Oil up $0.07 to $3.94 (all time record high) and Propane up $0.01 to $2.83 ($0.05 from the all time record high) http://www.eia.gov/petroleum/heatingoilpropane/



Heating Oil Historical Price Chart now at record level:

 http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET&s=W_EPD2F_PRS_NUS_DPG&f=W

The gradual climb in prices typically seen during the heating season is still to come.These are price levels never before seen and higher than in 2008, the last boom in electric heat when droves of people were converting to heating with electricity.
We are here to help you make the conversion in all or part to a more stable form of energy. We now offer the latest and perhaps the best option: The new Dimplex LC Convector (baseboard heater) which is an engineering masterpiece and game changer:
The linear convector is up to 42 percent shorter than conventional baseboard heaters. It features top discharge to transfer heated air to the room fast. A unique shark-fin blade shape for its heating element fins improves heat transfer and accelerates heated air into the room. This configuration also creates a laminar flow effect that reduces heat loss through the outside wall up to 10 percent, providing energy savings to the end user.  It comes in a range of sizes (500-2,500 W).

The high Heating Oil prices (and Propane) and the Middle East uncertainty is causing us to get orders for electric comfort heaters. Some people appear to be tearing out their entire system (Oil furnace, outdoor tank, etc) and installing baseboard heaters, floor drop-in heaters or wall heaters because there is already a hole in their floor or wall. Ceiling and cove panel infrared heaters are also popular.  People can switch to alot of different choices for heating and we intend to be the leader in helping people convert to electric comfort heating in response to this damaging and amazing rise in the cost of heating. They are a great choice for many people, especially when zoning rooms is part of the plan.

Other Electric Comfort Heaters:
http://www.morelectricheating.com/products/COMFORT%20HEATERS.aspx

Heating Oil Historical Price Chart now at record level

We are bracing for a surge in demand again as people switch to electric comfort heating in response to this damaging and amazing rise in the cost of heating.  It will be more of the same types of heaters people have been switching with, such as wall heaters, baseboard heaters, portable heaters, floor drop-in heaters, hotpod duct heaters, ceiling panels, cove heaters, etc. 



http://www.eia.doe.gov/oog/info/hopu/hopu.asp



Heating oil:

Heating oil and propane price update

The Energy Information Administration collects weekly heating oil and propane prices during the heating season which extends from October through March:

The weekly report is seen here: http://www.eia.gov/petroleum/heatingoilpropane/

If you would like to convert to electric heat see http://www.heatersplus.com/comfort.html for some options.

Survivors of Salem propane explosion are converting their house to electric heat

There is an often overlooked benefit of an all electric home with electric comfort heating versus propane and natural gas. It is possible, although rare, for gas to accumulate in a home and explode. A similar problem is carbon monoxide buildup. This is another reason that we believe electric heat is the future of heating, NOT an antiquated heating method, as many would want you to believe. 


A spark from a pressure switch on a home water system is believed to have ignited propane that accumulated in the basement of a home. The resulting blast killed six people and put five others in the hospital:

Read more: http://poststar.com/news/local/survivors-of-salem-propane-explosion-are-rebuilding-lives/article_deb4ae2e-f54e-11e0-9771-001cc4c03286.html#ixzz1afVbtJ6h

We hope that they are blessed with help from others, peace, hope, love, strength and compassion and know that they will be very happy with electric heat, which is an outstanding heating method to choose!

Huge increases seen in the first weekly EIA report on Heating Oil and Propane

The Energy Information Administration collects weekly heating oil and propane prices during the heating season which extends from October through March.

$3.69 / gallon is up $0.78 per gallon over 1 year ago

$2.77 / gallon is up $0.41 per gallon over 1 year ago

This will translate into total winter season heating cost increases of approximately $300-$700 depending on the size of the house and the fuel being used.

The weekly report is seen here: http://www.eia.gov/petroleum/heatingoilpropane/

That is why Mor Electric Heating is so busy, people are calling to convert to electric heat which can lower you bills dramatically because of zoning rooms. See http://www.heatersplus.com/comfort.html for some options.

A scare for heating oil and propane furnace users. Peak oil has been reached.

The second electric heating boom has started.  One factor (argued since 2005) is that peak oil is probably past us.  Both Goldman Sacks and the International Energy Agency are now saying this.  If supply is now less than demand, which is growing again, heating oil and propane prices will go up even more.  With future production levels from shale oil and tar sands now determined, many other prognosticators are also now saying that no increases in total delivered oil will ever happen again and 70 million barrels per day was the peak. If the Global Peak Oil date (all sources) was some time last year, then the “early peakers” were right after all.

http://theenergycollective.com/sklowem/61012/saudi-arabia-has-reached-peak-oil-output-commodities-rise-goldman-sachs

Here is how desperate and bad the situation has become: Oil crews have drilled a well 7.7 miles down into the ground and 7.1 miles out underneath the ocean (the world’s longest and deepest):

http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2011-06/end-earth-longest-deepest-oil-wells-world

Covert to electric comfort heaters now!

Breaking News: Goldman Sachs High Oil Price Forecast and a coming boom in Electric Comfort Heating due to high Heating Oil/Propane prices

Goldman Sachs just set the ball rolling on what has been predicted to happen. They are calling for oil prices to be much higher ($120 per barrel) by 2012 and substantially higher ($140 per barrel) by 2013.  http://www.businessweek.com/ap/financialnews/D9NDVEMG0.htm
Heating Oil, Propane and Gasoline will be $5.00 per gallon very soon.  Natural Gas will eventually buckle under the pressure and start to finally rise.  These are price levels never before seen and higher than in 2007/2008, the last boom in electric heat when droves of people were converting to heating with electricity.
We will soon be offering the best and newest answers to this problem.  Many of our Manufacturers are getting ready to launch amazing new products.  Qmark Marley has an amazing new baseboard heater and the new Dimplex LC Convector (baseboard heater) is already shipping in Canada and we intend to be fully up and running with stock on the ground in July.  Dimplex is adding to their already successful baseboard heater business with this engineering masterpiece and game changer:
To be available in summer 2011, the linear convector is up to 42 percent shorter than conventional baseboard heaters. It features top discharge to transfer heated air to the room fast. A unique shark-fin blade shape for its heating element fins improves heat transfer and accelerates heated air into the room. This configuration also creates a laminar flow effect that reduces heat loss through the outside wall up to 10 percent, providing energy savings to the end user.  It comes in a range of sizes (500-2,500 W).

Alaskan people are converting to electric heat!

In Alaska, Sitka’s Blue Lake and Ketchikan’s Whitman Lake hydro facilities may be expanded to accommodate rising electrical usage.

The Sitka project would increase the height of an existing dam and add a turbine to increase hydroelectric generation capacity about 30 percent to power the switch to electric heat. “It will allow us to generate more electricity over a year’s time with the same amount of water,” says Dean Orbison, the engineer overseeing the project for Sitka’s electrical utility. “We’ve found that with rising oil prices people have been switching to electric heat because it’s actually cheaper. So our loads are increasing and we’re raising the damn to meet the load,” he says.

Ketchikan would get additional generators powered by water from Whitman Lake for growing electrical demand also from home heating conversions. 


Link to the full story:  KFSK – Public Radio in Petersburg, Alaska – Local News

Heating Oil Users Meet . . . . . Electric Comfort Heaters!

The high Heating Oil prices (and Propane) and the Middle East uncertainty is causing us to get orders for electric comfort heaters. Some people appear to be tearing out their entire system (Oil furnace, outdoor tank, etc) and installing floor drop-in heaters or wall heaters because there is already a hole in their floor or wall. Ceiling and cove panel infrared heaters are also popular.  People can switch to alot of different choices for heating and we intend to be the leader in helping people convert to electric comfort heating in response to this damaging and amazing rise in the cost of heating. They are a great choice for many people, especially when zoning rooms is part of the plan.

Check out this list of Manufacturers of Electric Comfort Heaters:
https://www.google.com/bookmarks/l#!threadID=GLrVCKeyExR8/BDSFlDAoQqJmW9_Ql

Heating-oil prices unusually high | Seattle Times Newspaper

Local News | Heating-oil prices unusually high | Seattle Times Newspaper

Heating-oil prices unusually high
An unusually cool winter likely has left heating-oil tanks dry, but it might be smart to wait to refill.
By Brittney Wong
Seattle Times staff reporter
An unusually cool winter likely has left heating-oil tanks low, but it might be smart to wait to refill.
The price for heating oil is unseasonably high, said Lea Wilson, executive director of the Washington Oil Marketers Association. If you’re considering whether to replenish now, she suggests trying to hold out.
“I would wait until we’re in the peak of the summer months,” Wilson said. “That’s when you’d like to fill your tank; that’s when the diesel prices will be at their lowest.”
She estimated prices could be as much as 30 percent lower during July and August compared with current rates of $4.20 to $4.65 per gallon.
A typical Washington customer uses 600 to 700 gallons of oil per year, Wilson said, which means an annual bill of close to $3,000 at current prices. About 85,000 to 100,000 homes in Washington use oil heating.
Heating a home with natural gas costs a little more than $1,000 per year, according to Puget Sound Energy, and that includes heating water and other appliances.
Those who use electric baseboard heating spend about $570 a year for heating, according to Seattle City Light, and only $285 if they use electric heat pumps.
Kevin Cox, oil department manager at Olson Energy Service in Seattle, said the price spike is affecting business.
“Our customers are not taking as much oil; they’re having a more difficult time paying,” he said. “They’re telling us to hold off on deliveries and going without heat in some cases.”
Cox theorized that problems in the Middle East and the actions of oil speculators might be raising prices.
Ron Glatz, owner of Rossoe Energy Systems in Seattle, agreed. But he added that the heating-oil industry is becoming outdated and people are changing the way they receive power.
“[The industry] is in the mature state,” Glatz said. “Every day we have fewer customers because of the inroads from gas utilities.”
Wilson said demand in the Northeast and Midwest has been so high that it might be affecting oil availability here and driving up prices.
She said she expects prices to start dropping by late May.
“Every day we’re holding our breath to see what happens,” Cox said.
“We believe these prices are artificially high and they’re going to come down in the future, but we don’t know when the future will start.”
Brittney Wong: 206-464-3195 or bwong@seattletimes.com

Heating Oil and Propane Historical Price Charts. Now at record levels of both prices.

We are bracing for a surge in demand again as people switch to electric comfort heating in response to this damaging and amazing rise in the cost of heating.  It will be more of the same types of heaters people have been switching with, such as wall heaters, baseboard heaters, portable heaters, floor drop-in heaters, hotpod duct heaters, ceiling panels, cove heaters, etc. 


The DOE has finished releasing their winter update (October-March) on Heating Oil and Propane prices:
http://www.eia.doe.gov/oog/info/hopu/hopu.asp


They are declaring “The Heating Season is Over” which is ironic given the frigid temperatures and snowstorms (right now it’s in the 30’s or below in 15 states at 3pm EST, it’s snowing in Colorado, Kansas and Kentucky and a Nor’Easter is in the forecast for the end of the week.) A cold spring (or a continuation of winter) is looking likely.


Heating oil and Propane both ended at record highs near $4 and $3 respectively:  

Heating Oil & Propane prices surge more and round 2 of people converting to electric heat begins

The DOE releases their update on prices at 1 pm on Wednesdays.  Heating oil SURGED up by 12 cents to $3.87 per gallon after a similar surge last week. Still short of the 2008 record, but at this rate of increase, and tensions continuing in Libya and Saudi Arabia, it may climb beyond 2008.  Propane is still rising slowly and is now at $2.88 per gallon which is only a few cents below the record prices seen in 2008.
http://www.eia.doe.gov/oog/info/hopu/hopu.asp